A unique mom sees the value of her son on the farm

The link below is to a blog so good, it simply needs no enhancement.  See how a mom describes what happened to her son when he had the advantage to work on a farm, and why the current plan by the Dept. of Labor to keep kids from working on the farm is so misguided.

http://learningtosubmit.com/2012/04/25/should-rural-kids-be-allowed-to-work-on-farms-ranches/

The irony of ‘slime’

Well, even though it’s settled down some, there is a huge ‘dent’ of damage left over the so-called ‘pink slime’ debate held recently.  People lost their jobs.  Businesses closed. Consumers were scared.  And all for nothing.

But one of the biggest parts is the irony of the entire issue of finely textured beef.  Opponents, just as it is many times when people knee-jerk react before they look at facts or think about consequences, actually hurt their own cause.

Now I know you should never assume, but just for grins, let’s say these finely textured beef opponents also claim to care about the environment and food safety.

What are they fighting against? Finely textured beef is perfectly safe.  When steaks and roasts are cut, it creates the “trim” that becomes ground beef.  The compaines supplying lean finely textured beef use a process to remove a lot of the fat from the lean beef in the trim, which is then added to ground beef as a concentrated, lean source of protein.  It may also be SAFELY treated, just as many other foods are today, to eliminate possible bacteria contamination.  In short, the beef is safe, so says the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Here’s more.  Finely textured beef eliminates waste because it uses all the true beef available.  If it’s not used, the extra lean beef is thrown away.  Is that good for the earth, or for hungry people?

According to the amount gained, if finely textured beef isn’t used, beef demand would require another 1.5 million cattle.  Let’s see, 1.5 million times all the extra feed, water, extra space, etc. etc. etc. Does that make sense?

None of this yet deals with the bottom line.  Without finely textured beef, the price of your hamburger goes up, for no reason.

Then there is the issue of labeling.  Finely textured beef is just that…beef.  I guess the label could say “beef, with added beef.”  Would that be better?

Finely textured beef has been around for more than two decades, when the technology and idea became available to not waste this valuable lean protein.  All these folks who jumped on the ‘slime’ bandwagon so fast, without looking at facts or consequences should know this.  Lean finely textured beef is not necessarily ‘pink,’  It’s actually very environmentally ‘green.’  Next time, they should stop and think before their actions damage an industry, hurt other people, and hurt the environment they claim to care so much about.

More info and sources:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDiPjmsKeh8&feature=player_embedded

http://www.kfb.org/news/newsimages/pinkslimeisnt.pdf

http://beefisbeef.com/

A reflective harvest

Getting ready to unload on the go

Harvest is a tremendous time of year.  Growing up on a farm, and now working in town, harvest is an annual event I so look forward to.  It gets my mind clear.  I love the open air and space, I love reconnecting to a unique and wonderful group of people who grow food for all of us.  These people are the salt of the earth.  Their values, their caring for each other,are a tremendous boost whenever I’m there.

So, when our tenant called last Friday morning and said the corn dried out earlier than predicted, and they’d be in our field in the afternoon, I called my wife, we loaded up, and headed to the farm.

As we happily drove, with excited anticipation of being on the combines, tractors and trucks, watching the culmination of the miracle of growth of a crop, we saw some sobering sites.  As we passed many fields on the way to our own, we saw that this year would be different.  Farming in SC Kansas, we were on the edge of the severe drought that hit the Midwest this year.  We saw dryland and irrigated crops that didn’t look like year’s past.  We knew what that meant.  Many farmers would struggle this year.

Making room for more

What we also knew was ours was far from the worst.  Further west in Kansas, and into Oklahoma and Texas, many farmers had nothing.  The further we went, the more we reflected on our fortune.  No, we wouldn’t have the crop of past years, but we were blessed to have what we did.

We made it to the farm, rode the combines, tractors and trucks, and watched the corn flow.  It was still a wonderful harvest, but we did take time to talk about and ponder what could have been, and what was reality just a few miles west and south of our farm, as well as some who were not as fortunate right in our area.

Farming can be a teacher for all aspects of life.  When we think we don’t have what we want or all we’d like, we should consider others, who would be ecstatic just to have what we have.  We always try to count our blessings.  This year some of those blessings came in small yellow kernels a lot of good people didn’t have.  Take some time to count your blessings.  I’m betting you have more than you think.

Food with Integrity? Maybe Not

Sometimes I think agriculture is falling into a well-conceived trap.  We’re told we should market to the consumer, provide what the consumer wants, and it’s the only way to be successful.  While there clearly is merit in that belief, even to the point that it may be hard to survive without doing it, it begs a question of what has happened to that consumer, and where are they getting their information?

Before I continue, I must say that I believe one of the greatest words in the English language is ‘balance.’ So understand that I believe there is room for all kinds of agriculture.  I just don’t like it when one group misleads the public about another to boost a self-serving agenda.  Yes, I realize not all do, but some with large pocketbooks certainly are.

Just today, I learned of a new video from Chipotle, the burrito-making bunch.  It has some great music (though it’s sad Willie Nelson is drinking the cool-aid) with a well-done animation of a farmer, who is putting animals in fences and buildings, then sees the ‘error of his ways’ and releases them all, into this nirvana of open pasture, much to the delight of Chipotle.  The purpose and message behind the video and the Chipotle website is what they call ‘Food with Integrity.’  Well, to make their claim, they say, or imply, you must never use hormones or antibiotics, fencing or housing animals is not caring for them, and a host of other agenda-driven hype.

I can spend a lot of time talking about science-based and practical reasons why housing animals save many of their lives annually, especially this year during the heat and drought.  I can talk about predators, prudent use of antibiotics, the ‘natural’ presence of hormones, and a lot more about animal welfare and food safety.  But my real concern goes beyond all this.

I am concerned that the consumer is getting inaccurate and misleading information on purpose.  If  ‘modern’ or ‘traditional’ agriculture isn’t torn down, then other forms cannot be nearly as successful.  So, at whatever the cost, the public is being misled by some to believe that if a hog is housed, the farmer doesn’t care about its welfare, when actually just the opposite is likely true.  Hey Chipotle (and others this applies to), lying about food production hardly sounds like ‘Food with Integrity.’   It seems before we blindly accept ‘marketing to the consumer,’ we must continue and improve our effort to provide the consumer the truth.

Ag life: Growing up caring

I came across this picture the other day, shot by farm parents of their daughter.  It was a classic of how I grew up, how kids in agriculture grow up.  It’s about caring.  This girl wanted to be with her calf, making sure it was OK.  I remember the many, many nights as I was growing up we would check our cattle throughout the winter and bring in cold calves to the shed to dry off, keep warm, and take back to their moms the next morning.  We might have to bottle feed them.  We’d rub and massage them to get them warm, and we’d stay with them as long as needed.  Sometimes, we might even fall asleep with them.

The image you see here is the standard of the way I, and my neighbor kids, grew up.  It was about taking care of and respecting our animals.  This is agriculture.

Still plenty to be thankful for

Sometimes you wonder.  All the political bickering, the bashing of agriculture, misinformation by some groups who are trying to mislead the public, or just don’t know better.  What a mess!

But wait, let’s take a breath. Here are a few things to remember and be thankful for.  Call it a top ten list, not necessarily in any order.

1. OK, this one’s in order for me. First, thank you God for my life, your work in it, and the work I know is left to be done.

2. I’m thankful I can have Thanksgiving with my wife, daughter and other family, and pray for those who can’t.

3. Thanks, AgChat Foundation, for helping to get farmers to tell their story, so consumers can better know the truth, and know that the people who grow their food care about the land and animals.

4. A big #foodthanks to the farmers and ranchers who grow the food for this world, and especially all of those who are joining the #agvocate ranks.

5. Thanks to those who haven’t always agreed with me this year.  Some of you are hopeless :-), but truly, most of you have been great to visit with, and I’ve truly enjoyed the exchange of information.  I hope the learning and respect has gone both ways.

6. I’m thankful to live in a country where we are still free, and where our food is safe and abundant.

7. I’m thankful for my travels, where I’ve seen hungry people and know with the right plan farmers and ranchers can feed them, where it’s possible help them better feed themselves, and also feed a growing population, even through political challenges.

8. I’m thankful my work life brought me back to agriculture, where I can stay in touch with farmers and ranchers, help them do their jobs better, and support their ability to grow my food, and food for the world.

9. Thanks to the soldiers, the men and women who fight so we can take so much for granted, even though we shouldn’t (see no. 6).

10. Thanks for one of the best parts of my year, going back to the farm for harvest, and being refreshed by the farmers and ranchers who care for their land, water, and animals, and for the genuine honor they have, the humble attitude, and wishes to pass their legacy on to the next generation.

An additional thanks for the hope that we can have another year ahead, and somehow, some way, it can be better.  Happy Thanksgiving everyone!