The irony of ‘slime’

Well, even though it’s settled down some, there is a huge ‘dent’ of damage left over the so-called ‘pink slime’ debate held recently.  People lost their jobs.  Businesses closed. Consumers were scared.  And all for nothing.

But one of the biggest parts is the irony of the entire issue of finely textured beef.  Opponents, just as it is many times when people knee-jerk react before they look at facts or think about consequences, actually hurt their own cause.

Now I know you should never assume, but just for grins, let’s say these finely textured beef opponents also claim to care about the environment and food safety.

What are they fighting against? Finely textured beef is perfectly safe.  When steaks and roasts are cut, it creates the “trim” that becomes ground beef.  The compaines supplying lean finely textured beef use a process to remove a lot of the fat from the lean beef in the trim, which is then added to ground beef as a concentrated, lean source of protein.  It may also be SAFELY treated, just as many other foods are today, to eliminate possible bacteria contamination.  In short, the beef is safe, so says the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Here’s more.  Finely textured beef eliminates waste because it uses all the true beef available.  If it’s not used, the extra lean beef is thrown away.  Is that good for the earth, or for hungry people?

According to the amount gained, if finely textured beef isn’t used, beef demand would require another 1.5 million cattle.  Let’s see, 1.5 million times all the extra feed, water, extra space, etc. etc. etc. Does that make sense?

None of this yet deals with the bottom line.  Without finely textured beef, the price of your hamburger goes up, for no reason.

Then there is the issue of labeling.  Finely textured beef is just that…beef.  I guess the label could say “beef, with added beef.”  Would that be better?

Finely textured beef has been around for more than two decades, when the technology and idea became available to not waste this valuable lean protein.  All these folks who jumped on the ‘slime’ bandwagon so fast, without looking at facts or consequences should know this.  Lean finely textured beef is not necessarily ‘pink,’  It’s actually very environmentally ‘green.’  Next time, they should stop and think before their actions damage an industry, hurt other people, and hurt the environment they claim to care so much about.

More info and sources:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDiPjmsKeh8&feature=player_embedded

http://www.kfb.org/news/newsimages/pinkslimeisnt.pdf

http://beefisbeef.com/

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Labor Dept. needs some country living

People love to talk about ‘change.’  It’s understandable, because many things have changed over the years.  Probably one of the most easily recognizable is technology.  I now e-mail, tweet, post to facebook, watch video, check markets, navigate through cities, find restaurants and gas stations and a lot more on my ‘smartphone.’

Sometimes, I even make a phone call.

Girl and her calf on a Jackson, County Kansas farm

Modern Agriculture has changed dramatically too.  The amazing advances in technology make it the most efficient, productive, and environmentally sound food, fiber and fuel producing system in the world.

But a couple of things about agriculture have never changed, and the Department of Labor doesn’t understand it.  That’s why we now have what could be the most misguided proposal for the overregulation of agriculture we’ve ever seen.  You see, the Dept. of Labor wants to basically keep kids from helping, or working on the farm.  In the real world, that’s absurd on so many levels.  But Washington D.C. bureaucracy is not the real world.

Apparently, the Dept. of Labor doesn’t think youth under 16 can be around cattle, operate a mower or tractor, milk a cow, or cut weeds.  That’s just a few of the restrictions the new proposal would implement. In other words, many things I did growing up on our family farm, and all others before and after me, would be illegal.

I was starting to drive a tractor, ‘driving’ a pickup in a pasture to fix fence, riding horses to move cattle, and feeding cattle at around 9 yrs. old.  Could some of this be dangerous?  I suppose so.  But does the Dept. of Labor actually believe that my parents wanted me injured or killed?  Just as farmer Chris Chinn from Missouri told Congress in her real-life testimony on the issue, She, and I, were hurt more often and much worse at school than we ever were on the farm.  The farm is the perfect place and opportunity for parents to teach common-sense safety rules and precautions, the responsibility of handling expensive equipment, and the values of work.  That work ethic, and other skills and values I learned on the farm, has served me very well as an adult in my employment, relationships, finances and more.  We don’t need to keep kids from working on the farm, we need to get more out there.  I remember my city friends at school who came to see me on the farm, and some worked during the summer.  Their parents knew it was good for them to learn the responsibilities of taking care of animals, the value of equipment, the importance of a work ethic.  These kids were better adults because of their time on the farm.

The Dept. of Labor needs some country living.  Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran has invited Labor Secretary Hilda Solis to Kansas to see personally how these proposed rules can threaten the family farm and its historical value.  I hope she comes.  She needs to see the value system, the work ethic, and the skills learned on the farm.  I thank Sen. Moran and others in the Kansas delegation who are keeping up the fight to do away with this misguided overregulation.  If you grew up or work on a farm, you can help, too.  Just go to www.keepfamiliesfarming.com and tell your story.  Much of Washington D.C. doesn’t ‘get’ the value of rural living.  We must teach them through our action, or lose a heritage that will hurt everyone.

As the world turns, will it be fair to ag?

After a break to step back and reflect, nurse a replaced knee, and a few other things, this blog is back wondering about this world, its finances, and just where agriculture may fit in the mix.

I was able to travel to Europe a few months ago.  My nephew is stationed in Germany with the Air Force.  He is an avid traveler and expertly guided us through several countries during our stay.  The best part of the trip was that we went beyond the normal ‘tourist’ spots and included small villages, farms, small retail stops, and some other ‘off the beaten path’ areas.

One thing was clear.  Europe is broke.  If it weren’t for Germany, though it has its own problems, the EU would be folded now.  With Greece, Spain, Italy and others in dire financial shape, the future is more than uncertain.  People there are worried.  But interestingly, not just about the EU, but also the U.S.  In talking with people there, their fear is that the U.S. is trying to be like them.  Their advice?  Don’t do it, you can’t afford it!  A wonderful lady we spoke to who owned a small shop in Lucerne, Switzerland was the most blunt.  Switzerland is not part of the EU, and they still have the Swiss franc as currency, but she had plenty to say about the EU and its Euro currency.  “Some people don’t understand there is no money!  They expect the government to create it!  You can’t keep taxing entrepreneurial people and companies, they create the jobs.  More taxes, fewer jobs.  Workers want more, more, more.  Well there is no more, too much has been given already.  Everybody must take less.”

Sound familiar?  The same conversations are happening here in the U.S.  So what do you do?  Some want to tax the wealthy.  Well, according to my Switzerland friend, that’s a job killing action.  Some want to cut deeply into government spending.  Sounds good, and must be done, but how far do you go?  The trouble is our Congress is looking for any easy way out.  At the top of the list is agriculture.

We can expect that direct payments are probably gone.  Other payments may be, especially to farmers who ‘make too much.’  The problem is many in Congress are looking at gross income rather than net, and also don’t understand the finances of agriculture at all.  A farmer can make a half million dollars pretty easily, but when it takes nearly that much (or more) to make that money, or the experience of a crop loss devastates cash flow, it’s easy to see there isn’t much left when the dust settles.  Let’s keep in mind everybody eats, and protecting an agricultural ‘safety net’ is important.

Should farm programs and payments be looked at?  Yes.  Should farmers have to be part of the cuts in government spending? Yes.  But, should they only bear a fair portion of the cuts, just like everyone else?  Absolutely yes.  Congress needs the courage to tackle all spending, not just ‘easy targets.’  Agriculture, and the jobs it creates (nearly 20% of the workforce) deserves at least that.  We’ll see how it goes.

Bringing generations together to tell ag’s story

Whew, I’ve been traveling some lately, busy (aren’t we all) and have really neglected the blog.  Sorry about that.  But a recent event is certainly worth sharing, and a real feel-good story for agriculture.

Kansas Farm Bureau annually takes a group of county presidents to Washington, D.C. to give them a dose of relationship building, education, and even a little sightseeing opportunity in our nation’s capital.  Usually a group of KFB board members goes along.  They not only participate in the events, but also help guide the presidents in their own districts around D.C.

One individual this year did something new.  In past years, many presidents and others have brought their children along to give them the experience of D.C., but this year one board member took the next step.  He brought his parents, a child and their spouse, and grandchildren.  Four generations together to meet lawmakers, build relationships, and tell the story of their multigenerational farm and why the industry needs sensible, thought-out actions by lawmakers.  It was to say the least a unique way to clearly show, in one multigenerational voice, the ‘faces’ of agriculture.

This effort was valuable, not only to the lawmakers, but to the other farmers and ranchers attending, because it helped to show the importance of telling the agriculture story.  Oh, and it’s a pretty neat way to bring a family together too!

It’s tragedy, not politics

I hesitated for a long time debating with myself whether to write this, but as time went on, writing it won, so here is a ‘get it off my chest’ blog about the atrocity that is the shameless political use of the terrible tragedy that occurred in Arizona involving Dem. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.  I’ll go through some points, then have a comment on something curiously missing from the debate.

Now is probably the time to say that while I would rate myself much more conservative than anything else, I have no personal or professional allegience to Sarah Palin, Rush Limbaugh, or any other conservative commentator or politician, and certainly do not always agree with their views, though sometimes I do.

As soon as the shooting occurred, a host of hypocrites who apparently cared little about the victims, and more about not wasting a good tragedy, started blaming everyone from Sarah Palin, to any other conservative for prompting the action.  They also clearly wanted to imply that it is only conservatives that voice such things.  It was nuts, and thankfully, most of the nation has said so, but here are just a couple of thoughts:

Sarah Palin, Rush Limbaugh, nor any other conservative made this deranged nut in Arizona do this.  Got it?  He had threatened a host of people in the past, having nothing to do with politics.  This guy acted on his own.

Just to preserve a little balance, check out this diatribe from a Democrat who said a GOP governor should be shot. Still think this is a one-sided political discourse?  There are plenty more examples out there.

Also, the ignorant hypocrites who say they want more political ‘tone-down’ can be directly attributed to the host of death threats that Sarah Palin, Limbaugh, and other Tea Party members are now receiving.  Which side of their mouths would they like to speak from next?

Then come the gun control extremists.  Again, not wanting to waste a tragedy.  Well let’s look a little deeper into the Arizona situation.

This sheriff  Dupnik, (or is it Dipstick?) not only showed his political side, but just may be have been covering his own rear end.  It seems after some investigation that Dupnik knew Jared Loughner.  Loughner had been making death threats by phone to many people in Pima County including staff of Pima Community College, radio personalities and local bloggers. When the Pima County Sheriff’s Office was informed, his deputies assured the victims that he was being well managed by the mental health system. It was also suggested that further pressing of charges would be unnecessary and probably cause more problems than it solved.  One source said it may have been because Loughner had a relative working at the sheriff’s office.  I have no idea.

I do have an idea of the end result.  If the sheriff had arrested Loughner, and pursued charges, including felonies, Loughner would never have been able to purchase the gun he used in the killings.  Should the sheriff be held accountable?   The sheriff was well aware of the political discourse, and apparently felt Loughner wasn’t a threat.  How did he become a threat after the fact?

Do we want to tone down the political rhetoric?  Then let’s have the decency and ownership to say it needs to happen from all corners.  But let’s also note that rhetoric or not, and though it would be very beneficial to have a more reasonable discourse, nobody caused this madman in Arizona to perpetrate these terrible acts, and anybody trying to score political points at the expense of the lives of those lost and injured, should have their values checked.  It is amazing the blinders that can be placed on agenda-driven issues.

Oh, that item curiously missing from all the political exchange?  Thankfully, it appears Rep. Giffords is improving.  Funny you have to hear that from general sources, not the idiots trying to score political points.  I have no doubt I probably don’t share many of Rep. Giffords political views, though I may be surprised.  But I do pray for her complete recovery.  And I also pray for the victims who did not survive and their families.  Another tragedy has been that apparently a few (not all) of the victims, have joined the chorus of trying to blame someone other than Loughner for their pain.  I hope they wake up soon.

There is a bottom line here.  We are people, let’s start acting like it.

In the eye of the beholder

You hear a lot about media bias.  And yes, I believe there is a great deal of it, to the point that I believe very little  journalism exists from the network level down through major dailies, and even below.  Sometimes it’s not even hidden, sometimes it’s by omission, and often it’s by headline because many people are just headline readers.  You’ll also see bias in how some information not really wanted, but that must be included to at least imply impartiality, will be slipped in as late in the story as possible because so many others don’t take time to read all of an article.

Well, I ran across such an article the other day.  I’m not even going to get into the subject matter of the article itself and whether the action was right or wrong, that’s not the point.  I Just wanted to show the effect of the written word, depending on your views.  Here is the original article, word for word.

 

California Approves Use of Cancer-Causing Pesticide
Fresnobee.com via AP

FRESNO, Calif. — California pesticide regulators have approved a cancer-causing fumigant for use by fruit and vegetable growers, despite heavy opposition from environmental and farmworker groups.

Officials announced Wednesday that the state Department of Pesticide Regulation will register methyl iodide as a substitute for the pesticide, methyl bromide.

Methyl bromide is being phased out by international treaty.

The agency tentatively approved methyl iodide’s use in April, despite concerns by a scientific advisory panel that it could poison air and water.

Regulators insist the chemical can be used safely and say strict guidelines will be followed.

Tests have found no traces of the carcinogen in fruit from treated soil. The pesticide already is registered in 47 other states.


OK, from the headline on, you get the gist.  They may as well have said, “How could these people have possibly done this?”  As if to avoid it, at the end, if a reader goes that far, you finally see that 47 other states have approved it, and tests show no traces of chemical on the fruit.

But, if a regular observer/consumer is reading this, what if it said the following? Note the information is the same.

 

California joins 47 other states to approve agricultural economic tool
wherever.com

In what some are saying is overdue and could restore the fruit and vegetable growing sustainability of the region, California regulators have joined 47 other states in approving methyl iodide, a protective fumigant for fruit crops.

Following tentative approval in April, the state Department of Pesticide Regulation has now officially approved the crop tool, citing testing that show no traces of carcinogen in fruit after its use.

Methyl bromide was targeted for phase-out by some countries as part of an international treaty, forcing a substitute for the protection of California fruit crops.

In spite of safe testing results, some environmental groups are opposing the action, but regulators stress that the tool can be used safely and effectively under the guidelines imposed.

 

Sound a little different? If anything can be taken away from this, it’s that we should be careful of not only what we read, but how we read it.  We also need to make an attempt to put personal bias aside, and see if there is actually a jewel or two of truth we can discern.

Still plenty to be thankful for

Sometimes you wonder.  All the political bickering, the bashing of agriculture, misinformation by some groups who are trying to mislead the public, or just don’t know better.  What a mess!

But wait, let’s take a breath. Here are a few things to remember and be thankful for.  Call it a top ten list, not necessarily in any order.

1. OK, this one’s in order for me. First, thank you God for my life, your work in it, and the work I know is left to be done.

2. I’m thankful I can have Thanksgiving with my wife, daughter and other family, and pray for those who can’t.

3. Thanks, AgChat Foundation, for helping to get farmers to tell their story, so consumers can better know the truth, and know that the people who grow their food care about the land and animals.

4. A big #foodthanks to the farmers and ranchers who grow the food for this world, and especially all of those who are joining the #agvocate ranks.

5. Thanks to those who haven’t always agreed with me this year.  Some of you are hopeless :-), but truly, most of you have been great to visit with, and I’ve truly enjoyed the exchange of information.  I hope the learning and respect has gone both ways.

6. I’m thankful to live in a country where we are still free, and where our food is safe and abundant.

7. I’m thankful for my travels, where I’ve seen hungry people and know with the right plan farmers and ranchers can feed them, where it’s possible help them better feed themselves, and also feed a growing population, even through political challenges.

8. I’m thankful my work life brought me back to agriculture, where I can stay in touch with farmers and ranchers, help them do their jobs better, and support their ability to grow my food, and food for the world.

9. Thanks to the soldiers, the men and women who fight so we can take so much for granted, even though we shouldn’t (see no. 6).

10. Thanks for one of the best parts of my year, going back to the farm for harvest, and being refreshed by the farmers and ranchers who care for their land, water, and animals, and for the genuine honor they have, the humble attitude, and wishes to pass their legacy on to the next generation.

An additional thanks for the hope that we can have another year ahead, and somehow, some way, it can be better.  Happy Thanksgiving everyone!